Enabling Excellence through Equity: Lessons Learned

By: Tricia Seifert

The image conveys moving from one water-based space to another. On the left is a picture of a rushing waterfall; on the right, waves washing up on the beach.

At the closure of the “Enabling Excellence through Equity” conference, the presenter shared the famous Winnie the Pooh quote from A.A. Milne in the right-hand photo above; “You can’t stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come find you. You have to go to them sometimes.” I left the waterfalls, forests, and mountains of Montana to look up at the red bellied black snake hillside of the Woolyungah (the five islands), nestling my toes in the sand on the beach in Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. This wasn’t vacation — I was at a conference — but when people push your thinking and share ideas that ignite your imagination, it is a creative, generative holiday.

I spend the last week discussing how higher education can:

  • Widen participation from equity groups (Indigenous students; students from a Non-English speaking background; students with a disability; students from low SES backgrounds; regional and remote students)
  • Partner with schools, families, and communities to foster a higher education-going culture
  • Encourage and support students to see themselves as ‘uni material’ and develop necessary skills through robust enabling programs
  • Assist students as they transition to higher education and then as they enter the workforce

These were the central streams of the conference presented by the Equity Practitioners in Higher Education Australasia (@TherealEPHEA) and National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia. I am so thankful for the opportunity to leave my forest and learn from others in theirs. I wish to share some of what I take-away from the experience.

Take-Away #1: Widening participation in higher education is no longer a social justice imperative but an economic one.

Jobs of the future will require higher-order, complex, and critical thinking skills. There is a raft of evidence to this fact. I often cite the Center for Education and the Workforce report detailing the need for education beyond a school credential / high school diploma. But I was fascinated to learn of the 2019 study conducted by Deloitte Access Economics that found:

“social inclusion plays a critical role in lifting Australia’s living standards through increased productivity in the workplace, improved employment and health outcomes, reducing the cost of social services and by spreading the benefits of economic growth across society.”

Although I find it highly unfortunate that widening educational opportunity to groups historically under-served by higher education requires an economic justification to motivate policymakers to take action, I was excited to learn of the government provided Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program funding and support of the National Center for Student Equity in Higher Education (@NCSEHE). At a time when the government has re-instituted caps on the overall number of places for university study, HEPPP funding is not a panacea. That said, I applaud the overt support of efforts to bring higher education into schools and bridge what is often two silos.

Take-Away #2: Language is power; how we convey an idea has reverberating repercussions.  

This is the time in the conference where I had to do the most cross-cultural decoding of meaning. The conference organizer welcomed delegates by telling her personal story of higher education and shared she started her higher education journey through an ‘enabling program’. I was fortunate to have my friend and colleague, Sam Avitaia from the University of Wollongong-Bega, as my cultural translator and I asked her at morning tea what is enabling education.

As I grappled to understand this new concept, I kept looking for the American equivalent. In some ways, it may be akin to what we call ‘remedial education,’ which in its most generous term is referred to as ‘developmental education’. But here’s the distinction, remedial/developmental education is predicated on what students lack. There is something deficient about the students’ preparation and the university is called upon to fill in the deficiency.

After attending several enabling sessions at the conference, I came to understand that ‘enabling education’ comes from a different starting place. Rather than situating the student as deficient and in need of remediation, the student is seen as completely whole, with promise, potential, and capacity. The enabling education program is designed to assist students in calling upon their strengths in realizing their goals.

Dr. Leanne Holt, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous Strategy) at Macquarie University, also drove home the point of language. She shared how she was “not keen on support” and called on the delegates to re-frame their work as ‘student success.’ Again, ‘support’ as a noun suggests what students lack; what the university must shore up. ‘Success’ recognizes students’ capacities and strengths and places universities in the role of developing, fostering, enhancing, ‘supporting’ student capacity toward success.

Take-Away #3: Make the implicit, explicit. Decode the hidden curriculum

Sally Kift (@KiftSally) kicked off the conference with the opening keynote. It was a policy and practice Tour de Force. Amidst my furious writing of policy documents to download, she returned over and over to the fact that First Year Experience 3.0 must be whole-of-institution, shared responsibility for “transition pedagogy” (Kift, Nelson & Clarke, 2010).

Too often, students are left to arrive at university with their secret decoder ring to make sense of higher education’s ‘hidden curriculum’. However, for those who are First in Family (or first generation) to attend higher education, they have no such ring. These students must figure out #HowToUni (my favorite hashtag of the whole conference) on their own. Not only is this expectation of first-year students unfair, it is quite simply, wholly inequitable.

Drawing and extending from Dr. Kift’s presentation, I offer the following. If we are to realize the promise of widening participation, institutions must:

  1. Manage the transition by unpacking the hidden roles and inviting students to conceive of their own vision of success
  2. Acknowledge the diversity of its entering/commencing students and recognize these students come with different forms of capital that must be engaged as students master their new ‘student role’
  3. Design curricula with intention. Imagine curricula that was coherent, scaffolded, relevant, and organized in such a way that students received timely feedback on their performance. If higher education academic and professional staff purport to have this expertise, then students rightfully should expect them to employ it effectively.
  4. Create curricula that call on students to be teachers and learners with peers, academic and professional staff, industry, and with their families & communities. Learning is a social enterprise. We teach when we are engaged with another. We learn, similarly, in community.

As I reflect on an amazing conference, I am grateful for the opportunity to have shared and learned with equity and enabling practitioners and researchers from across Australasia. I come back to the Maori phrase written three times in my journal:

he tangata       he tangata       he tangata – it is people.

‘It is people’ (he tangata) is the answer to “what is the most important thing?” It is people who have spurred me to cultivate a rich sense of curiosity and inquiry. It is people, their possibilities and promise, that move me to teach.

Tricia Seifert is Head of the Department of Education at Montana State University and Associate Professor in the Adult & Higher Education program. She also curates the Supporting Student Success blog. If you wish to guest write for the blog, please leave a comment below, tweet @TriciaSeifert, or email tricia.seifert@montana.edu.

U Pick the Conference Proposal – Transatlantic Gaming for Higher Ed Student Success

Rather than a group of faculty members determining which proposals make it on the conference program, potential attendees at SXSW EDU review proposals and vote on what they want to see presented. Think academic conference meets American Idol; crowd support is paramount for being selected.

Kirsty Wadsley (@KirstyWadsley) and Tricia Seifert (@TriciaSeifert) wish to share the Blueprints college transition board game we have been playing with high school students on both sides of the Atlantic but WE NEED YOUR VOTE!

Voting for our proposal is easy but best done on a computer than phone.
1. Click on the this link: https://www.sxsw.com/apply-to-participate/panelpicker/

2. Create an account. You can do that by clicking Sign In or Sign Up in the upper right. Then you’ll need to verify the account via a link sent in email. If your link isn’t hyperlinked, copy and paste it into the browser.

3. Select “Vote Now”PanelPicker-Select Vote Now

4. Search “Transatlantic”

Search Transatlantic

5. Click “Vote Up”. While you are there, check out the additional supporting materials.Click Vote Up

6. And then leave a comment if you are so inclined.

We are absolutely thrilled to share what we have learned from students who have played the @_blueprints college transition game thus far. Comments like, “this game helped me realize there is more than one way to be academically successful in college” to “the game gave me an idea of what time management will really be like.” Students have raved about the games’ fun, interactive nature.

The Blueprints post-secondary/college transition board game is experiential learning at its finest. Students play, fail, learn, and advance. They strategize around time management and learn of the amazing people and programs that exist to help students succeed.

Going to college and/or university is a tremendous change for students. We hope to share the game with high school counselors and student affairs & services professionals. If the old saying “practice makes perfect” holds into today’s post-secondary context, then there is no better way for students to be successful in college than through practiced play.

Walking as Professional Development

#SeaChange2018 – Charlottetown, PEI – The first joint conference between CACUSS and ARUCC, two professional associations supporting student success in the Canadian post-secondary context. Over the course of the next five days, I’ll be blogging about my insights and learning from the conference. You can follow me @CdnStdntSuccess or @TriciaSeifert on Twitter for in-the-moment take-aways from individual sessions.

Day 1 – It’s Sunday and the day is full with pre-conference sessions for keeners. Yep, I’m one of them but instead of seeing the inside of a conference room, I’m out with 12 others enjoying the scenery on the Confederation Trail. This is the second annual “The Way is Made by Walking” pre-conference session, inspired by Arthur Boers’ book and several CACUSS members’ pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago trail in May 2016.

Walkers2018JPG

Sometimes it is difficult to explain to colleagues that my professional development begins with an 18 kilometer walk. People wonder what there is to be gained from just walking. They ask questions like:

  • How can walking count as PD?
  • What are the learning outcomes in a walk?
  • And perhaps, more importantly, how are they measured?

Pre-conference walking allows people to find their place, their rhythm, in a new location. I find it grounds me and provides a connection with the land on which we visit. I am grateful to walk the unceded terrritory of the Mi’kmaq people. Knowing that the bustle of the conference is yet to come, the walk affords me the space and time to reflect on my intention for the conference.

Why am I here? What do I want to learn?

I’m on a personal journey to examine my practice from a new perspective. I’m learning about Indigenous ways of knowing and doing. I’m reflecting on how my settler/colonial assumptions limit what I see and how I respond.

#SeaChange2018 conference organizers developed an entire stream of concurrent sessions focusing on indigenizing and decolonizing student affairs and services work (look for the IC notation in the conference program or app). I’ve marked a host of sessions in my conference program and I’m excited for Dr. Sheila Cote-Meek’s keynote on Wednesday. I picked up her book Colonized Classrooms: Racism, Trauma, and Resistance in Post-Secondary Education just the other week. There is much to learn, to think about, to reflect on, to ponder.

My intention for this conference began with the first steps on the trail this morning. The PD was in the moments of quiet reflection, noting the dairy cows in the field. The PD was in the community of sharing at the end.

 

Some may ask how is going for a walk PD. What are the milestones? Where is the destination? My answer is simple; the way is made by walking. The point is to walk; the walk is the destination.

Lupine

Exploring the Muddy Waters and Blue Skies of Supporting Student Success

By Jacqueline Beaulieu

Last week, I had the wonderful opportunity of presenting alongside Tricia Seifert at the Canadian Association of College and University Student Services’ (CACUSS) Annual Conference in Winnipeg, Manitoba (June 19-22, 2016). The theme of the conference, Muddy Waters, Blue Skies, supported conversations on the many challenges encountered when aiming to support student success as well as the blue skies of opportunity and possibilities of what could be for students, staff, faculty, and community members. In our presentation titled Principles for Creating Student Focused Postsecondary Organizations, we examined how communication, resource allocation, and institutional culture are perceived as shaping the development of student-focused organizational approaches.

The current study was initially undertaken as part of a case study research methods course. Data from two institutions were analyzed as part of the class project; data from two additional institutions have since been analyzed to develop the broader set of findings presented at the CACUSS Conference. Data from an additional 1-2 institutions will be analyzed prior to presenting overall findings at an upcoming scholarly conference (to be determined). If you attended Tricia Seifert’s recent CACUSS presentation on publishing in student affairs, you likely recall her encouragement to “never let a good class paper go unpublished”. This blog post represents one of many ways to disseminate findings and concepts developed during course and work-related projects.

The purpose of this blog is to provide an overview of the study, current findings, and a working set of principles for creating student-focused postsecondary organizations derived from the findings. It will explore some of the “muddy waters” (challenges) of supporting student success as well as how communication, resource allocation, and institutional culture can come together and create “blue skies” (opportunities and possibilities) for all students.

About the Current Study

The findings in this study were derived from an analysis of data collected during the first phase of the Supporting Student Success study. During this phase, qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted with nearly 300 student affairs and services staff from 9 universities and 5 colleges across Ontario. The purpose of the original study was to develop a more complete description of how Ontario’s post-secondary institutions are formally and informally structured as well as how staff perceive these structures as supporting and/or creating challenges for their ability to support student success.

This research focused on the larger research-intensive universities included in the broader sample given the range of centralized to decentralized organizational structures within this subsample and the range of stakeholders groups within each of the institutions and complexity of relationships between the many constituents.

Several theoretical frameworks including resource dependency theory (eg. Hillman, Withers, & Collins, 2009; Leslie & Slaughter, 1997; Tolbert, 1985), organizational ecology (eg. Carroll, 1984), and institutional logics informed the current study (eg. Thornton & Ocasio, 2008; Thornton, Ocasio, & Lounsbury, 2012). The current study tested propositions stemming from these frameworks as advanced by Pitcher, Cantwell, and Renn (2015).

Research Questions and Design

Central research question:

How do student affairs and services staff perceive their institution’s organizational structure and culture with respect to the development of a student-focused approach for program and service delivery?

Sub-questions:

  1. How are communication and resource allocation perceived as interacting with the development of student-focused organizational approaches?
  2. How do perceptions of communication, resource allocation, and institutional culture compare between more centralized and more decentralized organizational structures?

In terms of analysis, NVivo software was utilized to analyze interview and focus group transcripts as well as strategic planning documents. Open coding was utilized (Corbin & Strauss, 2014) followed by a theory-driven approach to collapse codes into categories. Themes within cases were identified by the researchers and then analyzed across cases. Pattern matching techniques (Yin, 2014) were utilized to examine if findings reflected perceived opportunities and challenges of centralized and decentralized organizational models as identified in the literature.

Institutions were placed along a continuum of organizational structures, ranging from more decentralized to more centralized, for the purposes of comparing findings across the institutions. Two of the institutions were categorized as highly centralized (Centralized University A and B) in which nearly all of the student affairs and service areas reported to the senior student affairs and services officer. An additional two institutions were identified as having a combination of centralized and decentralized features (Federated University A and B). Decentralized features may include units like career services that exist at both a university-wide and faculty-specific level. The number and nature of reporting lines as well as the distribution of student services determined degree of centralization.

Findings

Building Relationships and Communicating

At all of the institutions, participants perceived relationship building and communication as critical to one’s ability to support students. That being said, how informal networks developed varied in terms of:

Inward versus outward facing focus:

  • At the Centralized Universities and within centralized units at the Federated Universities, participants focused on internal communications with fellow centralized staff
  • At the Federated Universities, more examples were provided regarding relationship building and communication that was outward facing (eg. cross unit; with faculties)

Role of physical spaces and proximity of services:

  • Participants at the Centralized Universities as well as participants working in centralized units at the Federated Universities spoke of the importance of physical placements of services and how location influenced the development of relationships

Strategies utilized to foster positive relationships:

  • Participants at the Centralized Universities and Federated University A commented on the importance of forums, town halls, and socials
  • Participants at Federated University B described fewer campus-level initiatives, however, mentioned many meetings amongst staff working in the centralized unit

Interpreting the Relative Value of Resources

At all of the institutions, concerns were expressed regarding perceived declines in fiscal and human resources as well as subsequent impacts for students and staff.

Impact on relationship building and communication:

  • At Centralized University A and B as well as Federated University A, human resources were viewed as influencing the amount of available time for communicating with stakeholders and participating in socials

Impact of space and proximity of services on students and staff

  • At Centralized University A and Federated University A, participants discussed the appropriateness of types of spaces for programs/services offered, whether spaces were viewed as welcoming, and if proximity of locations supported informal relationship building

Viewing Students and the Role of Student Affairs and Services

At all of the institutions, providing the best possible support to students was considered a top priority. Yet, the focus of support varied. At Federated University B, students were often described as clients and customers and educating students regarding why and how to get involved was considered a strong emphasis of student affairs and services’ work. At Centralized University A and B and Federated University A, students were often described as co-facilitators and co-decision makers and students’ holistic development was prioritized.

Utilizing Strategic Planning to Offset Organizational Weaknesses

At Centralized University A, Federated University A, and Federated University B, strategic plans were described as providing clarity and direction regarding how the unit and institution would navigate critical issues. Strategic planning was also described as helping to mitigate tensions over resources by conveying priorities and creating fewer unknowns. At Centralized University B, participants referred less to strategic planning, however, staff members engaged in comparable levels of discussion related to departmental and institutional values as conveyed and fostered by senior leaders.

Implications

On that note, we have attempted to summarize our learning thus far in a working set of principles for student-focused postsecondary organizations.

Principles for Creating Student-Focused Postsecondary Organizations

As a student affairs unit,

  1. Strive towards achieving “optimal” balances of inward versus outward facing communication
  2. Enable and empower stakeholders to develop ongoing communication and relationships that support student success… and themselves! Support stakeholders towards feeling comfortable and confident in reaching out to one another.
  3. Consider how current space allocations and proximity of services influence communication, organizational culture, and student success.
  4. Use strategic planning processes and outcomes to augment organizational strengths and offset organizational weaknesses or gaps. Unify stakeholders, create conversations, bring clarity to change and in doing so, reduce tension and competition.
  5. Work as a community to define and co-create the learning environment that you aspire to become.
  6. Invite, listen to, and engage with the perspectives of faculty, students, and other community members.
  7. Foster individual and organizational resilience so that “when the going gets tough”, student success and learning remain paramount as organizational values and overall objectives.

Navigating the Muddy Waters, Blue Skies of Creating Student-Focused Postsecondary Organizations

Organizational shifts, not to mention organizational change, can be downright difficult. During the conference presentation, attendees discussed how to employ the principles outlined above in hypothetical case studies. When immersed in our own institutions, it may be challenging to see the possibility of the principles at work. Sometimes it is easier to think about organizational shift at a distance, which is precisely what case studies offer. We share the case studies, one situated at Centralized University and the other at Decentralized University here. With staff retreats just around the corner, we invite you to use these case studies with your staff. Having discussed the principles in the safety of a case study, it may open up the possibility to imagine applying these principles to your daily work and organization.

During the closing session of the conference, our Conference Weavers, Tricia Seifert and Neil Buddel provided an analysis of overall themes within conversations that unfolded during the week. Tricia and Neil encouraged conference participants to commit and take responsibility for creating change on our campuses and asked what we would commit ourselves to doing post-conference. In a similar spirit, I would like to close this blog post with a simple question:

What can you commit to doing to shift your postsecondary institution towards an increasingly student-focused approach?

One of my post-CACUSS commitments: writing this blog post with the hope that our findings will support colleagues in their efforts to support student success ☺. If you are willing, share your commitment(s) by “leaving a reply” in the space below or tweeting us @CdnStdntSuccess; we look forward to retweeting as many of these as possible!

Jacquie

 

References

Carroll, G. R. (1984). Organizational ecology. Annual Review of Sociology, 10(1), 71–93.

Corbin, J., & Strauss, A. (2014). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hillman, A. J., Withers, M. C., & Collins, B. J. (2009). Resource dependence theory: A review. Journal of Management, 35(6), 1404-1427.

Leslie, L. L., & Slaughter, S. A. (1997). The development and current status of market mechanisms in United States postsecondary education. Higher Education Policy, 10(3-4), 239-252.

Pitcher, E. N., Cantwell, B. J., & Renn, K. A. (2015, November). Inside access: Examining the promotion of student success through organizational perspectives. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education, Denver, CO.

Thornton, P. H., & Ocasio, W. (2008). Institutional logics. In R. Greenwood, C. Oliver, R. Suddaby, & K. Sahlin-Andersson (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of organizational institutionalism (pp. 99–129). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Thornton, P. H., Ocasio, W., & Lounsbury, M. (2012). The institutional logics perspective. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons, Inc..

Tolbert, P. S. (1985). Institutional environments and resource dependence: Sources of administrative structure in institutions of higher education. Administrative Science Quarterly, 30(1) 1-13.

Yin, R. K. (2014). Case study research: Design and methods (5th ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

Lessons from China: Education is Human

By Tricia Seifert

Recently Jeff Burrow invited our readers from around the world to share the great work they are doing to support student success by submitting an ACPA sponsored program proposal. There is so much we can learn from how colleagues in other contexts deal with issues and challenges in their work. In an effort to spark others to share, either in the form of a comment on our blog or with a sponsored program proposal, I would like to share my experience visiting and learning from staff who support students during my three week stay in China this past May.

I had the great fortune to spend time with colleagues at:

Beijing Normal University

Tsinghua University

Xi’an Jiaotong University

Yan’an University

Shanghai Jiaotong University

Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University

I don’t speak Mandarin but I quickly learned the words for teacher (laoshi) and student (xuesheng). Although I was often looked to as the teacher, I was as often the student and learned a tremendous amount from my hosts.

“Education is not eastern or western. Education is human.”

                                                                       – Malala Yousafzai*

I came across this quote after I returned from China but it captures my feelings and thoughts as I walked around these five university campuses. Beijing is more than 10,000 km from Toronto and yet I was struck by how the following three ideas appeared as powerful in one place as the other.

  1. Give peers a chance.

At one of the institutions where I toured, an undergraduate student served as tour guide, interpreter and college ambassador. As we walked through the hallway of this residential college (shuyuan), our student guide shared that undergraduate and graduate students are key members of the shuyuan’s advising committee, which provides voice for student initiatives and appeals at both the residential and academic college levels. Our guide also enthusiastically showed us spaces, within the shuyuan, where more advanced students volunteer as peer mentors and academic tutors. In this particular instance, the Society of Mentors had recently celebrated their fifth anniversary and received an honour from the central government for their work orienting new students to the college.

As I stood in the courtyard of this residential college, thousands of miles from Canada, I was struck by the similarity between our tour guide and the many students I’ve met collecting data as part of the Supporting Student Success research project. In Canada as well as in China, students beam with pride when they share examples of how their peers supporting other students to be successful in their postsecondary pursuits. Whether it is the Sophs at Western University who are instrumental on move-in day and beyond or students involved in the Peer Helper Program at the University of Guelph, we have met countless students who take great pride in exclaiming how students help students on their campus.

What has been affirmed in both eastern and western contexts is that peer culture is powerful. So the question that begs to be asked is, “how are staff and faculty recognizing and valuing positive peer culture and supporting programs in which students help students?” This is not a rhetorical question; please “leave a comment” in the area below so that all who read the blog can learn from the good work being done at your institution.

  1. Students are whole people and have to be supported holistically.

Across public institutions in China, there are literally thousands of staff members who hold the title, fudaoyuan or “advisor” in English. There are so many fudaoyuan because every student is assigned to one and each fudaoyuan advises several classes of students (each class has about 30 students). The fudaoyuan advises students in terms of progress in their academic program of study, career exploration and opportunities, and personal well-being and development. The fudaoyuan also take an active role in students’ moral and ideological education. The fudaoyuan are tasked with knowing and caring for the students in their charge. Although there are elements of a fudaoyuan’s work that feels parental, the fudaoyuan are expected to know their students and advise them as whole people. I remember speaking with a group of fudaoyuan at one institution and thinking how their work reminded me of the work of a “family doctor” – someone who was familiar with my overall health and wellness and could refer when necessary to a specialist.

Certainly, as higher education institutions have grown, student affairs and services divisions have spread out literally and figuratively across postsecondary campuses. To students, our offices might appear to be many specialist doctors – each focusing on their specific area. I recall during data collection for the Supporting Student Success research project visiting a campus where student affairs and services functions operated out of 17 locations on campus.

Interestingly, on the second visit to this institution, the many locations had been condensed considerably and embodied more of the “one stop shop” model in which students can register for classes, pay tuition, pick up financial aid, and perhaps meet with an academic advisor all in one place. Beyond the idea of a “one stop shop” location is the “family doctor” model that seems similar to the fudaoyuan approach I saw in China. The University of British Columbia has pioneered this notion within the Canadian context through their development of enrolment services professionals. Rather than being shuttled from one office to another, ESPs provide personalized support and a single point of contact to introduce students to the network of support available on campus.

Again, in eastern and western contexts, despite growing populations of students, there are opportunities to create positions (fudaoyuan or ESPs) within our organization and spaces within our organization’s physical landscape where students and their needs and development are recognized and addressed holistically. This blog is a space where people can share ideas and learn from others. Please “leave a comment” in the area below and share how you and your colleagues advise students from a holistic perspective.

  1. Supporting students requires professional development for staff.

Currently, China has few graduate programs preparing students to take on student affairs and services roles, whether these are fudaoyuan positions or in a more centralized student services functional area like counselling or career development. There was great interest in learning more about the kinds of coursework that graduate students in the U.S. and Canada would complete.

But beyond specific kinds of credentials, the work of fudaoyuan was acknowledged for the wide range of skills and abilities it requires. Not unlike the changing student demographics in North America, the student population in China is also changing. There was great interest in having more professional development opportunities to prepare staff members to work in meaningful, respectful and intentional ways with today’s student body.

Hearing the call for increased professional development could have been issued as quickly from colleagues in North America as China. Whether the challenges are around mental health or addressing internet usage and the role social media plays in creating community, having the professional support to gain knowledge and skills to address contemporary issues can not be overstated. This is an opportunity to crowdsource professional development (PD) opportunities that you have taken advantage of that you have found to be particularly useful. Please “leave a comment” in the space below so that others may learn from your PD experiences.

 

canada-china-relations

These three ideas illustrated that while the world is vast, many of education’s roots and values transcend geopolitical boundaries. Students in China like students in Canada and North America have the capacity and compassion to be positive peer role models and educators in their own right. Students are whole people and the challenges they face in their personal life may have direct bearing on their ability to do well in the classroom. Yet, it is difficult for staff to educate in a holistic fashion without continuing education, training and professional development.

The university campuses that I visited looked simultaneously nothing like a North American university (how many North American residence hall balconies serve as clothes lines?) and everything like a North American university (students studying at the library). It was a trip of embracing both the similar and the distinct.

Learning from colleagues in China ignited a passion to gain even greater insight about how student affairs and services work is practiced in different international contexts. In an effort to learn from each other, I invite you to “leave a comment” of what you have learned from your international colleagues below. I close by re-iterating the invitation to share your good work and contribute to the global conversation. Submit a sponsored program proposal to ACPA’s Commission for Global Dimensions of Student Development (proposals are due Sept. 4, 2014) or NASPA’s International Education Knowledge Community (proposals are due Sept. 5, 2014).

*Malala Yousafzai is a young girl who stood up for girl’s educational rights in Pakistan and was shot by the Taliban. She lived and has written a poignant autobiography titled, “I Am Malala

 

Share your great work – ACPA 2015 Call for Proposals and Reviewers

In the last few years, ACPA has highlighted a significant interest and movement in understanding how student affairs and services practitioners and educators from around the world support student success. As such, ACPA Commission for the Global Dimensions of Student Development (CGDSD) invites you to submit a proposal and/or to become a reviewer for the 2015 Conference in Tampa, FloridaTampa2015OL385x118

Specifically, the CGDSD seeks innovative proposals on topics related to how student affairs and services (SAS) staff support student success from different or comparative geographic areas and varied professional contexts.

If you are currently developing a proposal that focuses on:

– The practice(s) of student affairs globally,

– Interesting/innovative work in education abroad and/or international student and scholar programs,

– Examples of intercultural competence development at home or abroad, with students, staff or in graduate preparation programs, or

– Ideas and discussions on working with diverse populations of students

Then, you should consider submitting your program for sponsorship with the CGDSD.

Why Submit a Sponsored Program? Sponsored programs receive additional visibility among Commission members and receive greater promotion to all conference attendees though dedicated and additional spaces in the conference program and online. If you want to maximize your program’s exposure at Convention, there is no better way than as a sponsored program.

Submit a Sponsored Program. To have your program considered for sponsorship, simply select the ‘sponsored program’ box when beginning your application. CGDSD has 5 dedicated spots in the 2015 program. If your proposal covers multiple areas (e.g. career planning for international students), you can indicate co-sponsorship (by selecting that option instead of sponsored) and choose the relevant commissions on the next screen. The co-sponsored option means we can sponsor more great work as it only counts as 0.5 of our 5 allotted spots. Please note that proposals not selected for sponsorship will remain in consideration in the general program review!

Guide/Tips on Submitting a Proposal. You can find more information about the program submission process here and watch a great video on developing and submitting proposals to ACPA. All program submissions for the 2015 Convention are due on Wednesday September 4, 2014.

ACPA Seeks Program Reviewers. In addition to the call for sponsored programs, ACPA is also seeking members to review proposals. Reviewing proposal submissions is a great way to get involved with ACPA and help shape the conference program by bringing your international perspective to the review process.  You can sign up here http://cdms.myacpa.org/ and please don’t forget to select “Commission for Global Dimensions of Student Development” when selecting your interests (it is the 5th one down in the list). Those asked to review will receive 6-10 programs early in September.

By proposing sessions and becoming involved as reviewers, we advance the international outlook of ACPA and the other professional networks that we belong to.

Many thanks for your interest and please share our call for sponsored sessions and reviewers with colleagues interested in global practices, perspectives and programs of student affairs and services.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Jeff Burrow at burrow.jeff@gmail.com

Supporting Student Success Presentations at #CACUSS2014

CACUSS 2014 (#CACUSS2014) is less than a week away and the Supporting Student Success team is excited to present in a number of sessions. This post showcases the three sessions directly related to our ongoing research project as well as other presentations which involve members of the research team. For those who are not able to attend the conference in Halifax, we will post our presentation slides after the conference. Please check out the “Presentations and Publications” tab in late June.cacuss photo

Project-Related Presentations

301 – Blueprints for Student Success: Improving High School Students’ Awareness of Student Affairs And Services: Presented by: Christine Arnold and Kathleen Moore
Student affairs and services (SAS) have become integral components of Canadian colleges and universities. Increasing high school students’ awareness of service areas, programs and initiatives is imperative in order for students to make informed decisions regarding involvement, academics and health/wellness. This presentation will engage participants in our research-based Blueprints for Student Success website and mobile application developed to provide high school students with the knowledge and language necessary to navigate their transition to postsecondary education. Monday, June 9, 3:30-4:00 Session # 301, 200C2

602 – It’s All About What You Ask Them: Using Cognitive Interviews to Improve Student Assessment: Presented by Jeffrey Burrow, Diliana Peregrina-Kretz, and Tricia Seifert
The assessment of programs and services is a crucial step in improving and understanding student learning and development. Cognitive interviews can improve the quality of student affairs assessments by uncovering the cognitive processes participants use in responding to questions. This learning lab will introduce the theory and practice of CI’s and will highlight how they can improve assessment. Participants are asked to bring their own assessment examples so they can conduct mini-cognitive interviews during the session. Tuesday, June 10, 1:45 – 3:00, Session #602, Meeting Room #4

913 – How Do You Know? Why Do You Think So? Using Research to Inform Practice: Presented by: Tricia Seifert, Janet Morrison, David McMurray, and Karen Cornies
This panel presentation highlights the experiences of senior student affairs and services leaders in using research from the Supporting Student Success study. The panelists will share how they have used the findings from this research broadly, and in some cases their institution’s data specifically, to foster conversations with colleagues about the role of student affairs and services in supporting student success, re-organize and structure a division, and influence organizational culture. Wednesday, June 11, 9:30-10:45, Session #913, Suite 307

Members of the Supporting Student Success research team are also presenting in several other sessions. We invite you to check out their great work.

305 – Employer Perceptions of Co-Curricular Engagement and the Co-Curricular Record in the Hiring Process: Presented by Kimberly Elias
Universities and colleges promote the value of co-curricular engagement and the Co-Curricular Record (CCR) as a means to highlight transferable skills to employers. Listen to the results of a thesis study which examines the question: How are co-curricular experiences and the CCR perceived and valued by employers in the hiring process? This study explored current hiring processes, competencies and factors employers look for, and perceptions of the value of the CCR in the hiring process. Monday, June 9, 3:30-4:00, Session #305, Suite 306

411 – OPEN BOOK: Recent Literature in Student Affairs: Deanne Fisher, Rob Shea, Tricia Seifert, Ross McMillan, John Austin, Tamara Leary and Jeff Burrow
Each year, the Open Book session introduces participants to relevant and recent literature – good and bad – in student affairs and related fields. Our panel of readers present mini-reviews of books that have influenced our practice and the institutions in which we operate. This usually provokes a conversation about the big ideas that shape our work. Audience participation is encouraged! Monday, June 9, 4:15-5:30, Session # 411 Suite 205

90 Ideas in 90 Minutes: Research and Assessment section: Tricia Seifert and Jeff Burrow: Tuesday, June 10 | 8:45–10:30, 200C2

501 – Moving Forward – Transitioning Beyond the First Year: Presented by: Adina Burden, Diliana Peregrina-Kretz, and Lake Porter
The growing number of students with disabilities enrolling in post-secondary education requires that institutions provide comprehensive and tailored programs to meet their unique needs. Transition programs that introduce students to campus and student life are an integral component in supporting students with disabilities acclimate to the new environment. This session will provide participants with tools necessary to develop a successful transition program for students with disabilities including: planning, executing, and follow-up programming to support students. Tuesday, June 10, 11:15-12:30, Session #518, Meeting Room #4

518 – Understanding Icky: Making Difficult Ethical Decisions in Student Affairs: Presented by Chris McGrath and Tricia Seifert
We all make tough decisions under tough circumstances. But when the difficult choice results in a negative outcome for our students, our personal and professional ethics can easily collide. This is an opportunity to learn about models of moral and ethical decision making in professional practice, and to begin mapping our “moral languages” (Nash, 1996) towards a better understanding of how we make tough professional choices. Tuesday, June 10, 11:15-12:30, Session #518, Suite 202

605 – Navigating Transition Through Online Mentorship: Presented by: Leah McCormack-Smith and Steve Masse
In the spring of 2013, we rejuvenated our student transition program by pursuing a unique experiment with e-mentorship. Informed by current theories of student engagement and best practices emerging from our campus Student Communications Summit, we committed to matching our entire first-year class with successful upper-year e-mentors. During this session we will introduce you to the program, share our successes and challenges, as well as discuss our plans for the future! Tuesday, June 10, 1:45-3:00, Session #605, Suite 306

801 – Transfer Literacy: Assessing Informational Symmetries And Asymmetries: Presented by Christine Arnold
International researchers have voiced concerns regarding students’ understanding of credit transfer and the resulting impediments. An investigation of students’ clarity and confusion with credit transfer processes centers on the existent information system in place and its accessibility. In the Ontario context, this information system includes government/agencies, institutional administrators and students. This research seeks to examine the extent to which the college-to-university transfer information system is performing efficiently and identify (a)symmetries existent in stakeholders’ understanding of this process. Tuesday, June 10 4:15-4:45, Session #801, Room 200C2

1002 – Co-Curricular Record/Transcript: Establishing Standards and a Community of Support: Presented by Kimberly Elias and Chris Glove
The rapid adoption of the Co-Curricular Record/Transcript (CCR/T) program across Canada created a need for the CCR/T Professionals Network to form. This network recently met in May 2014 to develop a framework of recommendations on how CCR/T’s should be structured in Canada as it pertains to quality and standards. Participate in the ongoing discussion and share your thoughts and feedback on the recommendations developed at the Summit. No experience with CCR/T is needed to participate. Wednesday, June 11, 2014 11:15-12:30, Session #1002, Suite 202

We hope your conference is a great one, and that you are able to attend some of the eleven (11!) presentations we have featured here, as well as the dozens and dozens of other, amazing presentations scheduled for CACUSS 2014. See you in Halifax!